Bobby's Blog

What am I thinking about?

thecraftychemist:

Scale of the universe

Scroll to your hearts content from the Planck length to the diameter of the observable universe - click on any object and it will open an info box - I can’t imagine how much work must have gone into this. A few surprising things: Pluto has a smaller diameter than the width of the USA and Vatican city can fit in central park multiple times.

Find it here

(via thenewenlightenmentage)

(Source: jtotheizzoe, via pricklylegs)

science-junkie:

How To: Improve your Memory

Nearly everyone wants a better memory. To just be able to remember the last item on a shopping list, or where they put their car keys. But most importantly, remember all the information for exams. This video has tips and tricks to improving your memory in all kinds of ways.

Source:

1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memory
2. http://www.helpguide.org/life/improving_memory.htm
3. http://www.spring.org.uk/2013/10/10-surprising-and-mostly-easy-ways-to-improve-your-memory.php

nedhepburn:

touchmeordont:

kohenari:


Last month, when Glenn Ford was released from prison for a crime he didn’t commit, the state of Louisiana “gave him a $20 debit card for his troubles.” That, plus the four cents he had left in his prison account, was all he had.
How do you build up the material accumulations of a lifetime overnight? How do you do it with no money? Where do you even begin?
Ford’s friend John Thompson had a clever idea: Do what millions of Americans do when they are hoping that other people will buy them a whole bunch of stuff. Build an Amazon registry.

The Amazon Wish List is here.
Read the whole piece here.

Just bought this dude something off his wishlist. You should too.

Do this. 

nedhepburn:

touchmeordont:

kohenari:

Last month, when Glenn Ford was released from prison for a crime he didn’t commit, the state of Louisiana “gave him a $20 debit card for his troubles.” That, plus the four cents he had left in his prison account, was all he had.

How do you build up the material accumulations of a lifetime overnight? How do you do it with no money? Where do you even begin?

Ford’s friend John Thompson had a clever idea: Do what millions of Americans do when they are hoping that other people will buy them a whole bunch of stuff. Build an Amazon registry.

The Amazon Wish List is here.

Read the whole piece here.

Just bought this dude something off his wishlist. You should too.

Do this. 

(via pricklylegs)

science-junkie:

What is the Multiverse, and why do we think it exists? 

[…] Our observable Universe caps out at about 92 billion light-years in diameter, less than a thousand times as large in all directions as our previous scale. It contains some 10^80 atoms, clumped together in maybe a trillion galaxies, each with typically hundreds of billions of stars. But one of the most remarkable things about the Big Bang is that all of this, some 13.8 billion years ago, was once contained in a very small region of space, a region much smaller than our Solar System is today!

The thing that you might immediately wonder is whether there’s more Universe beyond the part that’s observable to us today, and — if so — how far does it go on? And what does it look like? And what are the physical laws in that part of the Universe?

Based on our observations of everything we’ve been able to see, from stars to galaxies to the leftover glow from the Big Bang to the matter in intergalactic space, we can learn some amazing things.

Read the full article by Ethan Siegel

(Source: memewhore)

thenewenlightenmentage:

A Solution To Stephen Hawking’s Black Hole Paradox

Earlier this year, Stephen Hawking proposed a radical reformulation in how we define black holes — but this explanation still left a big unanswered question to how black holes work. Now, a physicist says he’s cracked that problem.

The problem centers around just what happens to information when it is encountered by a black hole. A black hole is held to be surrounded by a glow of radiation called Hawking radiation, which is theorized to slowly take over the black hole and then eventually evaporate over incredible amounts of time. But as the radiation evaporates, the information it contains would theoretically be destroyed — leaving the problem of just what happened to it unsolved.

That’s where Chris Adami of Michigan State University says that his solution comes in. The answer to what happened to the information, he explained in a statement, lies in the concept of stimulated emission—- basically the information is copied, much like you would with a Xerox:

Stimulated emission is the physical process behind LASERS (Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation). Basically, it works like a copy machine: you throw something into the machine, and two identical somethings come out. If you throw information at a black hole, just before it is swallowed, the black hole first makes a copy that is left outside. This copying mechanism was discovered by Albert Einstein in 1917, and without it, physics cannot be consistent,”

It’s an interesting idea that could offer a potentially elegant explanation to the paradox of just how information is dealt with by black holes. What’s more, Adami says that his solution fits with Hawking’s theory, showing that his theory of how a black hole evaporates is correct.

You can check out the full paper, published by Adami and Greg Ver Steeg of the University of Southern California in Classical and Quantum Gravity, here — and tell us what you think of the new solution below.